Peruvian Ceviche with rocoto


I was once invited to ConstruWeekend, an event that happens every year in my country by entrepreneurs from the construction sector, in Cap Cana. The organizers are in charge of making this week very special and fun for all who meet there. The first activity we did was with a Peruvian chef, who taught us to prepare one of my favorite dishes: Ceviche, of course, Peruvian. I love this dish, but I don’t like to feel raw fish. To avoid this, you have to let the fish rest in enough salt before placing all the ingredients in it. What caught my attention the most about this recipe is that it has a touch that makes it even more exquisite, and that I had never heard of before: it has spicy rocoto cream. (Rocoto chile peppers are a staple pepper used in Peruvian cuisine). A few days ago I prepared it for German (it's his favorite) to celebrate our wedding anniversary. He brought white wine and listening to my 80's music (yes, including Michael Jackson) I managed to get rid of the routine and stress to make way for the enjoyment of culinary art. Here is the recipe.

Ingredients:

For the Rocoto Cream:

• 1 Ají rocoto (rocoto pepper)

• 1 Spicy chili pepper (may be pepperoncino seeds)

• Salt

• Pepper

• 1/4 cup of water

For Ceviche:

• 8 Limes

• 1 lb of Grouper fish

• Red onion

• Cilantro (chopped)

• Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

  • To make the rocoto cream, take all the ingredients to the food processor, mix until creamy. Store the cream.

  • For the ceviche, cut the fish into thin strips (or cubes if you prefer). Put it on a plate, and sprinkle plenty of salt. Let it rest. In a separate bowl, place two tablespoons of rocoto cream, lime juice, cilantro, salt and pepper. We stir and add the fish.

  • Particularly, I like to leave the ceviche resting in the fridge, because it cooks and does not have that characteristic texture of raw fish.

  • On this occasion, to accompany the ceviche, I bought a bag of chips or fried food (speaking in good Dominican), say: sweet potato, potatoes, yautía or even yam. The ideal situation would be to make fried sweet potato, but taking into account the time, I preferred to make things easier, and this case the bag of mixed chips seemed easier.

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About me...

Welcome to my Web! I am Helen Núñez, a dominican journalist living in USA. I am the mother of three children: Rodrigo, Fernando and baby Valentina. Here I share with you my discoveries and experiences as a Mom, the exquisite and unusual places I encounter, and the recipes I create in my forever attempt of becoming a chef. 

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© 2017 by Helen Núñez