Hashimoto's thyroiditis Between pains and overweight

May 28, 2018

 

 

 

 

After giving birth to my first child, Rodrigo, I could say that two months after, I began to feel some unusual body pains: I felt that all the joints of my body hurt, an intense back pain that made it difficult to walk straight, pain on one side of the head, long story short, I had pain all around the entire body. I assumed, as my family warned me, that it was the consequences of bad sleep (because of a nursing baby), and lack of rest. As the months went by, I got worse, and neither the diets based on lettuce and chicken, or the gym, or the aesthetic treatments that I began to undergo to lose weight, or the Orlistat that I was taking, helped me lose those 40 extra pounds that I still had after 7 months of birth.

 

 

(In my first activity after returning to work. I looked happy, but inside, very sore!)

 

I confess that they were very hard days, because I felt that the world would come down to me, every time I visited all the different specialists, and sat down to listen their misdiagnoses: that I didn’t have depression, that I had fibromyalgia, and even that it was a hypochondriac. And that's how I became an expert in medical images: magnetic resonance imaging, tomography, X-rays, sonography, contrast media, more laboratory tests, and even those specials tests that get sent abroad and last months to arrive, because I endured them all, and I investigated all of them before I had anything done.

 

Even without a diagnosis, I didn’t have anything to say those who made fun of my overweight issue. There were many who hurt my feelings with their, "Helen went carelessly", "She gave birth to boys, her problem", "looks like you are still 6 months pregnant with that belly!", but deep down I had the hope that I would find a good doctor who would figure out what was behind all this.

 

And who would had said it... I went to so many fancy doctor offices! One day, speaking with a good friend, she advised me to go to a doctor who had a modest clinic, not well known, and with fees that were, by far, the lowest I had paid in this whole process. "That sounds like thyroid," he told me instantly. When he touched the thyroid gland, he confirmed it, because it was inflamed, I cried out in pain. After having a simple test done, he finally gave me the long-awaited diagnosis: "You have Hashimoto's Thyroiditis."

 

 

(Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: It is a condition caused by a reaction of the immune system against the thyroid gland. It often results in a decrease in thyroid function (hypothyroidism)

 

I, ignorant of the subject, only managed to ask if I had a cure. In my case, I had a multinodular goiter, which caused my thyroid to be enlarged. The doctor told me that the gland had to be removed, since it had abnormal cells in it. Faced with such a daunting diagnosis, my father, always positive, just said, "That can be cured with radishes,” and it was, despite the fact that some doctors advise that their consumption be minimal if you suffer from thyroid, specifically hypothyroidism.

 

Two weeks went by in which I ate radish even with bread. As you know, our grandparents always solved their pains with home remedies, and my dad was no exception. When I went back to the doctor, the nodules were suddenly gone, and the thyroid had dropped quite a bit, so it did not have to be removed, for my peace of mind.

 

From what nobody saved me, was to be hypothyroid, because this is a condition that typically happens after Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, in which you have to take lifelong medication (Levothyroxine), to control the function of the thyroid.

After a few months of diagnosis, and being treated, I began to lose weight and the pain began to disappear. I went back to normal! And to talk again with the one friend who had told me I looked like I was 6 months pregnant. hehehe.

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